1984 Kennedy Half Dollar Value (“P”, “D”, “S” & Rare Errors)

Jenson Cambell

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Half Dollar

It’s not often that you stumble upon a coin with an actual “P” for a mint mark. The 1984 Half Dollar is one of those coins. And because it is part of the Kennedy Half Dollar series, it has been extensively hoarded by collectors and the general public.

One can only wonder, what effect has this hoarding had on the value of the 1984 Half Dollar? Below are some figures that can give you an idea.

Mint Good (G4) Fine (F12) Extremely Fine (XF40) Uncirculated

(MS60)

Brilliant Uncirculated (MS63)
1984-P Half Dollar $1 $1 $1 $5 $9
1984-D Half Dollar $1 $1 $1 $5 $9
1984-S Proof Half Dollar $2 $3

Source: PCGS, 2023

1984 Half Dollar: Historical Background

The 1984 Half Dollar is also known as the 1984 Kennedy Half Dollar. Because it features the profile of the youngest person to ever assume office in the United States: the 35th President, John F. Kennedy.

JFK’s portrait has appeared on the Half Dollar since March 1964, a mere four months after his assassination. That’s a fast turnover as far as U.S. Mint designs go. The reason why they could do it this fast is because the U.S. Mint used already existing designs.

The 1964 Kennedy Half Dollar was a hit both at home and abroad. Unfortunately, it was heavily hoarded for its popularity and silver content, so much so that it triggered the passing of the Coinage Act of 1965 and the eventual switch to copper and nickel planchets.

1984 Half Dollar: Physical Features

1984 Half Dollar Value

The 1984 Half Dollar was among those Kennedy Half Dollars affected by the Coinage Act of 1965. It was struck on copper-nickel planchets. Despite the lack of silver in the coin’s metallic makeup, it retains its silver appearance.

Below is a highlight of the 1984 Kennedy Half Dollar’s physical attributes:

1984 Half Dollar: Physical Characteristics

Physical Feature Notes
Metallic Composition 91.67% Copper

8.33% Nickel

Weight 11.34 grams
Diameter 30.6 mm
Edge Reeded

No coin has a blank face; how about we talk about the faces of the 1984 Kennedy Half Dollar?

Obverse Design and Features

1984 Half Dollar Obverse Design and Features

The 1984 Half Dollar’s obverse is a tribute to President John Fitzgerald Kennedy, arguably the most popular American President of all time. The design you see on the 1984 Half Dollar has been used on Half Dollars since 1964. It was designed by U.S. Mint engraver Gilroy Roberts.

In his design, Roberts borrowed heavily from the JFK bust he had made for the Presidential Series Medal. Upon JFK’s widow’s request, Gilroy Roberts modified the President’s hair and did away with his shoulder.

Below is a pictorial comparison between Gilroy Roberts’ JFK Presidential Medal and his final Half Dollar obverse design:

Gilroy’s final design for the obverse included the following elements:

  • The word “LIBERTY” arches along the upper rim of the coin.
  • The left-facing portrait of JFK is at the center of the coin and imposed over the “BER” of “LIBERTY.”
  • The broken motto “IN GOD WE TRUST,” the phrase “IN GOD” is on the left, and “WE TRUST” is on the right
  • The mint mark(either P, D, or S), struck below the President’s bust
  • The year of issue “1984,” arching along the lower rim of the coin
  • The designer’s initials “R” (for Roberts), embossed along the edge of JFK’s neck

Reverse Design and Features

1984 Half Dollar Reverse Design and Features

The 1984 Half Dollar’s reverse was also borrowed from the 1961 JFK Presidential Medal. And because it was Frank Gasparro’s design on the medal’s reverse, he was granted the opportunity to work on the Kennedy Half Dollar’s reverse.

In his Half Dollar design, Gasparro did a modification of the Presidential Seal, the same design he used on the 1961 Presidential Medal and the 1962 JFK Appreciation Medal.

Here’s a pictorial comparison between these medals and the design that was eventually used on the Kennedy Half Dollar:

On the reverse of the Kennedy Half Dollar, Gasparro included the following elements:

  • A modified version of the Presidential Sealstruck at the center of the coin
  • The country of issue, “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,” arching over the Presidential Seal
  • The denomination “HALF DOLLAR” arching along the lower rim of the coin
  • The designer’s initials “FG” (for Frank Gasparro), embossed under the bald eagle’s left thigh

1984 Half Dollar: Varieties and Valuation

All three U.S. Mints participated in some capacity in the 1984 Half Dollar’s production. Between them, they gave us three varieties of the 1984 Kennedy Half Dollar with three distinct mint marks.

1984-P Half Dollar Value

1984-P Half Dollar Value
1984-P Kennedy Half Dollar

In 1984, the Philadelphia Mint struck 26,029,000 coins. Unlike their usual strikes, this one actually included the “P” mint mark. But how much value do they hold today?

Not much, apparently. Considering that 1984 was not such a long time ago, this shouldn’t come as a surprise. Circulated versions of the coin are worth about $1, with mint state examples fetching slightly higher prices.

Below is a chart highlighting the estimated value of various grades of the 1984-P Half Dollar:

1984 Half Dollar Condition Estimated Value
Good (G4) $1
Very Good (G8) $1
Fine (F12) $1
Very Fine (F20) $1
Extremely Fine (XF40) $1
About Uncirculated (AU50) $1
Uncirculated (MS60) $5
Brilliant Uncirculated (MS63) $9

Source: PCGS, 2023

The value of a 1984-P Half Dollar does go up with the condition of the coin. The most expensive 1984-P Kennedy Half Dollar ever sold was graded an unbelievable MS67, and it sold for $1,116.25.

1984-D Half Dollar Value

1984-D Half Dollar Value
1984-D Kennedy Half Dollar

Not to be left behind in production, the Denver Mint struck 26,262,158 coins. Not much separates Denver’s mintage from Philadelphia’s, and it shows in the value of their coins, too. Whether you’re holding a 1984-D or 1984-P Half Dollar, it doesn’t matter. As long as they are in the same condition, they hold roughly the same value.

Just take a look at the valuation figures below in comparison to the previous table.

1984 Half Dollar Condition Estimated Value
Good (G4) $1
Very Good (G8) $1
Fine (F12) $1
Very Fine (F20) $1
Extremely Fine (XF40) $1
About Uncirculated (AU50) $1
Uncirculated (MS60) $5
Brilliant Uncirculated (MS63) $9

Source: PCGS, 2023

The finest 1984-D Half Dollar is graded MS67+, making it the single finest example that we know of. This particular coin sold for a record-breaking $3,760.

1984-S Half Dollar Value

1984-S Half Dollar Value
1984-S Kennedy Half Dollar

The San Fransisco Mint was charged with minting proof coins, and they struck 3,065,110 of these coins. Proof coins are struck on highly polished planchets, making them look glossier than regular-struck 1984-P and 1984-D Half Dollars.

These 1984-S Half Dollars were sold to collectors. So, most of them will be in mint condition. Their pristine condition, however, does not guarantee greater returns. It turns out that a 1984-S Half Dollar is typically less valuable than its 1984-P and 1984-D counterparts of the same grade.

1984 Half Dollar Condition Estimated Value
Uncirculated (PR60) $2
Brilliant Uncirculated (PR63) $3

Source: PCGS, 2023

The finest 1984-S Half Dollar is graded PR70DCAM. It has a deep cameo and is sharply contrasted. This coin sold for only $690.

1984 Half Dollar: Valuable Error 1984 Half Dollars

Recently struck coins don’t offer much in terms of value. Finding the right error coin could just be your best shot toward a very valuable coin. Below are some interesting 1984 Half Dollar error coins:

1. 1884 Half Dollar with Double Die Obverse and Double Die Reverse Errors: Selling for $250

1884 Half Dollar with Double Die Obverse and Double Die Reverse Error

The double die error occurs when the planchet shifts during punching. It can cause a doubling effect along the edges of some of the coin’s details. In this particular coin, the error is visible on both faces of the 1984 Half Dollar, causing a doubling effect around the country of issue and the Presidential Seal.

2. 1984 Half Dollar with Strike-Through Error: Selling for $75

1984 Half Dollar with Strike-Through Error

Strike-through coin errors occur when debris and foreign objects get between the die and planchet. The foreign object impresses itself, leaving grooves and cracks on the coin. This particular coin is showing some groves on the Presidential Seal.

3. 1984-D Half Dollar with RPM and DDO Errors: Selling for $24

1984-D Half Dollar with RPM and DDO Errors

This coin has a Double Die Obverse (DDO) error that affects most of the coin’s obverse details, including the mint mark. When this error occurs on the mint mark, we call it a Repunched Mint Mark (RPM) error. In this coin, there’s a recognizable doubling on the “D” mint mark.

1984 Half Dollar: Is it Worth Collecting

The 1984 half dollar is not such a valuable coin. Perhaps not enough time has passed to render the coin rare. That said, uncirculated coins offer more value than circulated examples. If you’re going this route, it’s advisable that you collect something closer to the MS70 or PR70DCAM grading.

1984 Kennedy Half Dollar Value chart

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